New and old, passive renovation from 1860 and new passive house 2013

The old and the new can live in good harmony- The grey house that was built in 1860 got the passive house treatment with 170mm of extenal insulation behind the ventilated fasade last year. The red house is brand new, a standard Scanhome Skagerrack 304 with 355mm of wall insulation within the timber frame constuction.

Passive renovation and new passive house

Passive renovation and new passive house

Seasonal store of solar heat, over 100 degrees

This Monday was quite exiting before we got the 23.000 liter seasonal store tank in the basement connected to the 50 m2 of solar-panels on the roof of the old building. The small tank of 3.300 liter (located in the stairwell of the 1860 house) could not handle the heat generated by our solar-collectors. We had 110 degrees water coming down and it was coming close to boiling. We had to ask the tenants to leave the heat on and open the windows to cool off the system for a while.

18m2 U-tube vacuumtubes and 32m2 flatplate generate a peak of 27kW

18m2 U-tube vacuumtubes and 32m2 flatplate generate a peak of 27kW

On Tuesday 13th of May,  Åke Häggmann, Peter and Tobias connected the finned copper tubes in the bottom of the tank. Finally there is somewhere for us to pump away the superfluous heat from the roof. It will be interesting to measure up the various flows and temperatures to analyze the functionality of the system. This is done by Dr. Shane Colclough as part of the EINSTEIN research-program.

It is a pity that the collectors are shadowed by the Library-building across the street for the winter months, but of course, that is partly the reason for building a seasonal store in the first place.

 

Finned Cupori 22mm copperpipes at bottom of large tank

Finned Cupori 22mm copper-pipes at bottom of 23.600 liter large tank

3.300 liter small tank

3.300 liter small tank

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Passive apartments after 2 weeks

Passive Scanhome apartments with Lysekils church in background

Passive Scanhome apartments with Lysekils church in background

The super-erection-team Flaherty and Goaley with Peter, John, Darragh, Ruadhan, Adrian and Cathal are plowing on. After two weeks of construction the roof is nearly completed with clay tiles and all. A good bit of extra seal-effort around the roof windows are always done by Scandinavian Homes when we install these problematic windows. (all roof windows are, this is not connected to any particular manufacturer)

Triple glazed roof windows are sometimes supplied with an extra frame with a bit of foam for insulation of the frame. But we see major flaws with this. Rainwater and wind penetration. A hopeless “apron” is supplied with the kit and this is supposed to keep wind and rain out. Worst possible detail, just a cover-up so you cannot see how poor the methods of sealing are. This is of extra concern in well insulated houses where massive amounts of roof insulation will soak up eventual water for years. To make it worse, the vapour barrier on the inside of the insulation will prevent detection of eventual water-leaks. Problems will be hidden for years and the risk is that the roof is rotting away under the roofwindow(s). 

Soyabased Sica Maestic seal is injected around the roofwindow with flashband sealed with hot-air gun.

Soyabased Sica Maestic seal is injected around the roofwindow with flashband sealed with hot-air gun.

In the basement Peter installs double plasterboards

In the basement Peter installs double plasterboards in ceiling, 220mm Paroc insulation above.

Passive apartments wooden construction in Sweden May 2013

We are currently building a small apartment-building in Lysekil, Sweden. Located on top of undulating granite rocks behind our office. On this location a merchant house was located from 1846 onwards. The main building, a timber panelled log building from 1860 was carefully renovated to passive standards by our Irish team last year. This time it is a lot easier, Scandinavian Homes standard methods for modular construction makes the build process very fast. The reaction from the locals in this small Swedish town is that they have never seen anything being built as fast.

Foundation made from 30cm Leca blocks and ground-floor joisting laid out day one.

Foundation made from 30cm Leca blocks and ground-floor joisting laid out day one.

Second storey passive apartment all wood

Second storey walla for passive apartment, all wood

An oddity for this build is that we skimped on the inner layer of plasterboard that is normally factory fitted. Reason is that when we build in the late spring, only 2km from our factory, the risk of rain damaging the exposed insulation is minimal.

Expert passive house builders Flaherty and Goaley from Ireland erects the entire structure in a few days

Expert passive house builders Flaherty and Goaley from Ireland erects the entire structure in a few days

Timeconsuming to fix the external cladding on site. Normally this is done in our factory. This time we really wanted to stay true to the mid-1800 feel to the location, so to avoid visible horizontal joints of the panel, we install the panels on site.

Southern gable with relatively large windows and a fully glazed balcony door for each apartment

Southern gable with relatively large windows and a fully glazed balcony door for each apartment

In the insulated basement the 24.000 liter tank resides. It will handle the hot water from the collectors n the roof of our old building.

In the insulated basement the 24.000 liter tank resides. It will handle the hot water from the solar collectors on the roof of our old building.