INTERESTING PROJECTS SKAGERACK 188 IN GALWAY — UPDATE WITH PICTURES –NO TILES IN THE KITCHEN!

S188GWA wall on production table

S188GWA wall on production table

We publish a few more pictures of the construction of this two-storey house that is now nearing completion. This is a Nordica 94 in two-storey version called Skagerack 188. Superpassive specification (335mm of pure insulation in wall, 700mm in roof), large array of PV solar on the roof and some sections of the facade cladded with natural stone.

Scroll to bottom to see all pictures!

Our jig for precision manufacturing of floor cassettes in house-factory.

Our jig for precision manufacturing of floor cassettes in our factory.

 

 

 

 

 

Our customer Gareth Walsh asked a question about tiles in the kitchen of his newly built Skagerack 188 that could be of general interest, so we share the conversation here:

S188 packet of factory made closed panel walls protected in cage, ready to be shipped

S188 packet of factory made closed panel walls protected in cage, ready to be shipped

House after the first week in December 2015

House after the first week in December 2015

Hi Lars, When agreeing the contract I asked for all floors except all bathrooms and utility to the engineered pine and that is what you included. I am being strongly encouraged to tile the kitchen area around the island. This comes to about 9 sqm. Would this be a problem for you to reduce the flooring area in pine by this much? I assume that the wood flooring you included also includes finishing with oil? Gareth

Dear Gareth,
I don’t agree with tiles in the kitchen at all, I will try to explain our thinking:.

a) In places where you stand a lot, for example around the hob and sink, it is very bad to have hard tiles. In fact, it would be illegal for health reasons if it was a workplace. A bouncy mat is usually located where you stand, eg. in front of machines. This is even more important in a warm and clean house where you stand without shoes.

Kitchen from 1995 with Morkaskog oiled engineered pine floor in a Scandinavian Home. Cleaned with white-soap all this years and survived OK after bringing up 3 children.

Kitchen from 1995 with Morkaskog oiled engineered pine floor in a Scandinavian Home. Cleaned with white-soap all this years and survived OK after bringing up 3 children.

b) Cleanliness-wise, it is a lot easier to clean the wooden floor than the a tiled floor, it is smooth and has no dirt-collecting grout recesses.

c) The most important reason to not have tiles in the kitchen is because of their conductive nature. This ceramic material is naturally cold to the touch compared to wood. This is because the heat energy is absorbed or “sucked” into the tile like with most conducive materials eg. metals. This would be OK if floor-heat is left on, however, if floor- heat is used under large tiled areas the house tends to overheat even in the winter. Contrary to common belief, it is better to have a wooden floor on top of the concrete, it evens out the heat given off, and adds to the thermal stability of the house. Keep in mind that there is almost a foot of insulation under the concrete. This is why we recommend to focus the floor-heat in the relatively small tiled wet-rooms and possibly inside the front door.

Classic bathroom in a new Scandinavian Homes house, all tiled, comortable with the standard floor heat

Classic bathroom in a new Scandinavian Homes house, all tiled, comfortable with the standard floor heat

d) If you drop something on a tiled floor it breaks, if you drop something on a wooden floating floor it usually survives.

e) Wooden panels can be used for the walls in bathrooms in warm and ventilated houses. Not behind the shower of course, but for the rest of the room and even behind the bath tub it is OK. We are however always careful to waterproof the floor and walls in all wet-rooms. Our special seal-system is applied before the tiling and wood-panelling.

Bathroom slated floor in a Scanhome from 2003

Slated bathroom floor in a Scanhome from 2003.  Linseed-oil painted wooden panels. Observe the tiles turned up around the walls.

 
f) Yes, the Mörkaskog engineered pine-floor is lyed and oiled from factory.

atb Lars

More pictures from the build:

On day of erection the roof construction with regular rooftrusses  shown.

On day of erection the roof construction with regular roof-trusses shown.

Tusses with support for gangway in cold attic. Under this gangway the 700mm depth of cellulose insulation can easily be checked in the future.

Trusses with support for gangway in cold attic. Under this gangway the 700mm depth of cellulose insulation can easily be checked in the future.

Gangway and some ventilation ducts installed, all insulation is not blown in place at this time

Gangway and some ventilation ducts installed, all insulation is not blown in place at this time

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

More pictures;

Addition of final 70mm service-cavity filled with 70mm of Rockwool. At this stage the fantastic air-tightness figure of 0.19 exchanges per hour at 50 Pa was already achieved.

Addition of final 70mm service-cavity filled with 70mm of Rockwool. At this stage the fantastic air-tightness figure of 0.19 exchanges per hour at 50 Pa was already achieved. Super-carpenters John Goaley and Cathal Lydon in action..

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nearing completion in Early April, 3.5 months from start.

Nearing completion in early April, 3.5 months from start.

 

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