VISIT US AND MEET OUR PASSIVE HOUSE ARCHITECT PETER LOHR – SATURDAY FEBRUARY 18TH

We are delighted to give the opportunity to all interested to meet in person with our passive house architect Peter Lohr.SCH announce showhouse Feb 2017The best time to experience a warm passive house without heating system is in the winter.

Let’s hope for cold and windy weather!

This house was built in 2005, so you get to see what it looks like after 11 years.

Livingroom used as lecture room in passive house

We will give passive house presentations with question and answer sessions.

Whole house ventilation system with heat recovery explained.

Lars Pettersson, Passive house enthusiast

Lars Pettersson, Passive house enthusiast

Lots of different plans and price proposals are available.All interested are welcome.No appointment needed, just show up!

Find directions to our passive house in Moycullen, Galway here:

www.scanhome.ie 

Interesting projects: Crazy design for fabulous Hibernia 109 overlooking Fjord in Sweden

Crazy design for passive house in Lysekil high on rocks, overlooking the Gullmars-Fjord. A normal Hibernia 109 is Super-tweaked by Designstudio Geir Henning.

Update with pictures of completed home. The alu-zink coated roof looks very shiny when new. It will develop and look more dull with age.

H109 Cedar cladded extension and square dormer

Hibernia 109 with Cedar cladding on extension + a square dormer

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hibernia 109 Scandinavian Homes passive house with cedar extension and alu-zinc coated steel roof by Plannja. Built in Lysekil, Sweden.

Hibernia 109 Scandinavian Homes passive house with cedar extension and alu-zinc coated steel roof by Plannja. Built in Lysekil, Sweden.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cadar cladded extension to Hibernia house at a cliff in Lysekil. If you like this, be aware! It is quite expensive! And it take a lot of skilled maintenance too keep the warm beauty of new freshly oiled cedar panels.

Cedar cladding extension to Hibernia house at a cliff in Lysekil. If you like this, be aware! It is quite expensive! And it takes a lot of skilled maintenance too keep the warm beauty of new freshly oiled cedar panels.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Some interior footage of home:

A word of warning when installing large panoramic windows. External shading must be provided to prevent over-heating. This is difficult to do in a wind-exposed coastal location as this.

Livingroom with a view: Large windows with electric automatic built-in shuttering to prevent overheating.

Living room with a view: Large windows with electric automatic built-in shuttering to prevent overheating.

Our solution is NorDan-Screens. This is a new NorDan innovation with automatic remote controlled shutters integrated with the windows. We install windows with shuttering in the wall sections in our house-factory. The system can run automatically or via the remote control.
Read more here: http://www.nordan.se/proff/nordan-screens

Modern open plan kitchen with crazy ceiling mounted monster extract fan over cooker. This can suck up small children so be careful!

Modern open plan kitchen with crazy ceiling mounted monster extract fan over cooker. This can suck up small children so be careful!

 

Open plan kitchen and living area creates luxurious feeling of space and this takes advantage of the extraordinary ocean view.

 

 

 

Wall hung WC makes cleaning easier but maintenance of WC more difficult. We prefer the Ifö model that is wall hung but still shows the cistern

Wall hung WC makes cleaning easier but maintenance of WC more difficult. We prefer the Ifö model that is wall hung but still shows the cistern

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This is Scandinavian Homes house number 295 since we started business.

House #295 Hibernia 109 with felted roof overlooking fjord

Our solution is NorDa

Spectacular setting in the rocks after a lot of rock-blasting and construction of retaining walls. Scandinavian Homes crew had good luck with the weather this time, the erection worked out just as planned and on time.

Highly insulated raft foundation ready for concrete in April 2016.

Highly insulated raft foundation ready for concrete in April 2016.

 

Fun design

Hibernia 113 with high roofpitch and spectaccular view of Gullmars-Fjorden

Hibernia 109 with high roof-pitch and spectacular view of Gullmars-Fjorden.

Passive house

Velded roofing material at floor and wall ´+ dormer roof

Waiting for velding of roofing material, this is done later the same day.                                               Roof and dormer covered with our high performance (modern and traditional) roofing-felt Supertak YEP700.

 

 

Roofintegrated balcony

Balcony integrated in roof

Balcony integrated in roof

 

INTERESTING PROJECTS SKAGERACK 188 IN GALWAY — UPDATE WITH PICTURES –NO TILES IN THE KITCHEN!

S188GWA wall on production table

S188GWA wall on production table

We publish a few more pictures of the construction of this two-storey house that is now nearing completion. This is a Nordica 94 in two-storey version called Skagerack 188. Superpassive specification (335mm of pure insulation in wall, 700mm in roof), large array of PV solar on the roof and some sections of the facade cladded with natural stone.

Scroll to bottom to see all pictures!

Our jig for precision manufacturing of floor cassettes in house-factory.

Our jig for precision manufacturing of floor cassettes in our factory.

 

 

 

 

 

Our customer Gareth Walsh asked a question about tiles in the kitchen of his newly built Skagerack 188 that could be of general interest, so we share the conversation here:

S188 packet of factory made closed panel walls protected in cage, ready to be shipped

S188 packet of factory made closed panel walls protected in cage, ready to be shipped

House after the first week in December 2015

House after the first week in December 2015

Hi Lars, When agreeing the contract I asked for all floors except all bathrooms and utility to the engineered pine and that is what you included. I am being strongly encouraged to tile the kitchen area around the island. This comes to about 9 sqm. Would this be a problem for you to reduce the flooring area in pine by this much? I assume that the wood flooring you included also includes finishing with oil? Gareth

Dear Gareth,
I don’t agree with tiles in the kitchen at all, I will try to explain our thinking:.

a) In places where you stand a lot, for example around the hob and sink, it is very bad to have hard tiles. In fact, it would be illegal for health reasons if it was a workplace. A bouncy mat is usually located where you stand, eg. in front of machines. This is even more important in a warm and clean house where you stand without shoes.

Kitchen from 1995 with Morkaskog oiled engineered pine floor in a Scandinavian Home. Cleaned with white-soap all this years and survived OK after bringing up 3 children.

Kitchen from 1995 with Morkaskog oiled engineered pine floor in a Scandinavian Home. Cleaned with white-soap all this years and survived OK after bringing up 3 children.

b) Cleanliness-wise, it is a lot easier to clean the wooden floor than the a tiled floor, it is smooth and has no dirt-collecting grout recesses.

c) The most important reason to not have tiles in the kitchen is because of their conductive nature. This ceramic material is naturally cold to the touch compared to wood. This is because the heat energy is absorbed or “sucked” into the tile like with most conducive materials eg. metals. This would be OK if floor-heat is left on, however, if floor- heat is used under large tiled areas the house tends to overheat even in the winter. Contrary to common belief, it is better to have a wooden floor on top of the concrete, it evens out the heat given off, and adds to the thermal stability of the house. Keep in mind that there is almost a foot of insulation under the concrete. This is why we recommend to focus the floor-heat in the relatively small tiled wet-rooms and possibly inside the front door.

Classic bathroom in a new Scandinavian Homes house, all tiled, comortable with the standard floor heat

Classic bathroom in a new Scandinavian Homes house, all tiled, comfortable with the standard floor heat

d) If you drop something on a tiled floor it breaks, if you drop something on a wooden floating floor it usually survives.

e) Wooden panels can be used for the walls in bathrooms in warm and ventilated houses. Not behind the shower of course, but for the rest of the room and even behind the bath tub it is OK. We are however always careful to waterproof the floor and walls in all wet-rooms. Our special seal-system is applied before the tiling and wood-panelling.

Bathroom slated floor in a Scanhome from 2003

Slated bathroom floor in a Scanhome from 2003.  Linseed-oil painted wooden panels. Observe the tiles turned up around the walls.

 
f) Yes, the Mörkaskog engineered pine-floor is lyed and oiled from factory.

atb Lars

More pictures from the build:

On day of erection the roof construction with regular rooftrusses  shown.

On day of erection the roof construction with regular roof-trusses shown.

Tusses with support for gangway in cold attic. Under this gangway the 700mm depth of cellulose insulation can easily be checked in the future.

Trusses with support for gangway in cold attic. Under this gangway the 700mm depth of cellulose insulation can easily be checked in the future.

Gangway and some ventilation ducts installed, all insulation is not blown in place at this time

Gangway and some ventilation ducts installed, all insulation is not blown in place at this time

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

More pictures;

Addition of final 70mm service-cavity filled with 70mm of Rockwool. At this stage the fantastic air-tightness figure of 0.19 exchanges per hour at 50 Pa was already achieved.

Addition of final 70mm service-cavity filled with 70mm of Rockwool. At this stage the fantastic air-tightness figure of 0.19 exchanges per hour at 50 Pa was already achieved. Super-carpenters John Goaley and Cathal Lydon in action..

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nearing completion in Early April, 3.5 months from start.

Nearing completion in early April, 3.5 months from start.

 

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NEW RECORD ? – 0.19 AIR-EXCHANGES/HOUR @ 50 Pa

Peter Flaherty and Thomas Monaghan of Advanced Airtighness Solutions after a successful airtightnesstest.

Peter Flaherty and Thomas Monaghan of Advanced Airtighness Solutions after a successful airtightness test on February 10th 2016.

Passive House verification sheet.

Passive House verification sheet.

A record air-tightness of  0.19 air-exchanges per hour at 50 Pa pressure was measured at the preliminary pressure test today. The house is a Skagerack 188 built in Galway city.

Walls flipped over at production table in factory

Walls of two-storey house flipped over at production table in factory

This house was produced in our factory in late November and erection on site started on December 1st.

Scandinavian Homes standardized production methods ensure a uniform quality. This is extra valuable when building two-storey houses where it can be tricky to get the construction air tight between the floors.

House in factory last week of November 2015

House in factory last week of November 2015

The German Passive House Institute require an air-tightness <0.6 exchanges/h, so 0.19 exchanges/h is considered very good. That said, we still focus more on the outer air-tightness. For real world heat-losses in windy climates, we consider this outer air-tightness more important than the inner air-tightness that can be measured with this blower door test.

Another funny fact is that since PHI in Darmstadt does not recognize Swedish test results of the REC Temovex Blue 4 HRV unit (92% efficiency in Sweden),we are handicapped by being forced to use poorer default value of 80%

House after the first week in December 2015

House after the first week in December 2015

PASSIVE HIBERNIA 164 WITH DOUBLE GARAGE IN GALWAY

This is what it will look like when ready (computer simulation)

This is what it will look like when ready (computer simulation)

All the latest updates are incorporated in this Hibernia 164 with double garage built just outside of Galway in October 2015.

Packet of walls lifted onto trailer at Scandinavian Homes timber-frame factory on October 1st

Packet of walls lifted onto trailer at Scandinavian Homes timber-frame factory on October 1st

This family home is similar to our first passive house used as office and demonstration house.

New higher passive roof-trusses gives even more space to the upstairs while maintaining the very high degree of roof-insulation.

An Hibernia 164 with double garage is quite a large house that fits onto two trailers including all materials needed for construction

A Hibernia 164 with double garage is quite a large house that fits onto two trailers including all materials needed for construction

 

  • Improved passive-windows
  • Toughened glass
  • Double LE coating
  • Swiss spacer
  • Double argon-fill
  • Completely maintenance free external alu-cladding to the completely wooden windows.
Practically all materials needed for a complete passive house are loaded onto the trailers at the Scanhome factory

Practically all materials needed for a complete passive house are loaded onto two trailers at the Scandinavian homes factory

It takes only a few days to prepare the insulated raft foundation the week before the house arrives

At 07.00 in the morning the first trailer arrives to the prepared foundation

At 07.00 in the morning the first trailer arrives to the prepared foundation.

The measurements are all within +/- 5mm so it fits precisely on the base-units.

The insulation under and around the concrete makes it completely dry once the house is built.

 

 

H164 walls and gable ends are installed, next comes the roof-trusses

H164 walls and gable ends are installed, next comes the roof-trusses

On top of the foundations edge we add a special sill-felt and the unique double S-seal to be absolutely sure that the joint between foundation and wall is air and vapour proof

 

 

 

Passive rooftrusses spaced at 1.2m cc

Passive roof-trusses spaced at 1.2m cc

Highly insulated remote controlled wooden garage doors. Factory installed.

Highly insulated remote controlled wooden garage doors. Factory installed.

The double garage is fully insulated. The wooden garage doors are quiet, draft proof and very well insulated.

Very few trusses are used because they are spaced so far apart.

 

 

At the end of the first day the walls and roof trusses are installed. Next day the sarking and roofing felt completes the weather proofing of the new house

At the end of the first day the walls and roof trusses are installed. Next day the sarking and roofing felt completes the weather proofing of the new house

 

A total floor-area of 370m2 (4000 sq ft) including garage makes this Hibernia quite large.

 

 

 

It is one of the most price-efficient houses that can be built. The price per m2 comes down dramatically when larger houses as this are built with a bulky shape.

It also gives extreme energy-performance thanks to the small surface area to floor-area ratio.

 

Update November 17th:

All ready for slates

Passive Hibernia 164 second week of construction. New shorter overhang and shading box will be added later to protect against over-heaating.

Airtighness at the most critical point, the eaves

Airtightness at eaves, age.proof vapour barrier is sealed to truss and seal coming from groundfloor.

Ceiling downstairs with noggins between joists

Ceiling downstairs with noggins visible between the joists

Phasechange plaster-boards are used to balance the heat over day and night. Knauf Comfortboard. Intelligent Temperature Control

Phasechange plasterboards are used to balance the heat over day and night

Massive triple glazed Velux windows ready to go onto the roof

Massive triple glazed Velux windows ready to go onto the roof

Materials in garage. All included in house-delivery

Materials in garage. All included in house-delivery

Preparations, planned work and good order at Scandinavian Homes site

Preparations, planned work and good order at Scandinavian Homes site

Roof-windows airtightness and insulation of sloping roof

Roof-windows airtightness and insulation of sloping roof

Superpassive wall missing is 70mm of Rockwool in service cavity inside of vapourbarrier

Superpassive wall missing is 70mm of Rockwool in service cavity inside of vapourbarrier

The men that makes it happen, John Goaley, Peter Flaherty and Anders Johansson

The men that makes it happen, John Goaley, Peter Flaherty and Anders Johansson

 

 

We were lucky with the weather for a few weeks to finish off most of the external work.

When the rain and wind howls around the corners in the west of Ireland It is great to work away in a dry, clean and warm house.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It is easy to reach very quality when all conditions are controlled.

All materials on site and good order.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The same expert installers do: carpentry, ventilation, air-tightness and insulation.

This assures a quick and seamless procedure.

RADIO 1 TODAY WITH SEAN O’ROURKE TALKS TO OUR OWN DR. SHANE COLCLOUGH

Construction Industry Federations director general Tom Parlin got it all wrong. He said that rainwater harvesting and photo-volt cells are part of the passive house concept. RTE1 logo Sean

Shane explains how the whole concept works and he said that it should take a toaster to heat a 100m2 passive house. Not true, it takes only half a toaster!

Read about Shane’s solar reseach at our research pages. Shane is also chairman for the Irish Passive House association.

Listen here:   http://www.rte.ie/radio/utils/radioplayer/rteradioweb.html#!rii=9%3A20799238%3A15036%3A18%2D06%2D2015%3A

 

NORDICA 125 SUPERPASSIVE IN MOYCULLEN, GALWAY

This is Scandinavian Homes house #286 since start in 1991. It’s one of the most popular family houses of the type Nordica 125. The house is located in Moycullen near Galway.

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07.00 a.m. when we arrived to the work it looked like this.

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In anticipation for the first truck to arrive we prepared everything and drilled the fixing stays that will help keep the walls in place during the assembly.


 

 

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After a while the first truck arrived with the main walls. The chauffeur had a hard time to find the right way and the boreen to the was very narrow. But nothing is impossible for Scandinavian Homes.


 IMG_0373BWall no.1 in the air

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The truck needed some help by the crane to turn around.

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Wall no. 2 on it’s route.

 

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The founder (Lars Pettersson) came down to have a look and found a four-footed friend.


 

 

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Adrian putting up the first roof truss.


 

 

 

 

 

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From inside.

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You need to have good balance to build houses.

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_0434B18.00 p.m. at the end of the first day it looked like this.

On Friday, after only four days of construction the erection phase is over and the house looks fairly finished.

Passive house after four days of construction

Passive house after four days of construction

INTERNATIONAL PASSIVE HOUSE CONFERENCE 2015 IN LEIPZIG

International passive house conference Leipzig germany 2015Report by Lars Pettersson of Scandinavian Homes after attending the 19th International Passive House Conference in Leipzig, Germany, 17-19th April 2015.

Dr. Shane Clclough chairman of Passive Hoiuse association of Ireland presented 5 years result of monitoring of Scandinavian homes Passive house in Galway

Dr. Shane Colclough, chairman of Passive House Association of Ireland presented 5 years result of monitoring of Scandinavian Homes Passive house in Galway

The International Passive House Conference is a truly international happening with participants from all over the world. The Irish were present with some excellent presentations.

Passive House association of Ireland PHAi

Passive House association of Ireland PHAi

Tomas-OLeary-of-MosArt-and-Shane-Colclough-discussing-the Passive house conference

Tomas-OLeary-of-MosArt-and-Shane-Colclough-discussing-the Passive house conference

Tomas O’Leary of Mos-Art talked about the EnerPHit methodology for passive house refurbishments with practical advice. He emphasised the need for understanding of the process by all participants before the actual work commences.

Coillte Panel Products with their Air Tight OSB (Smart-Ply) from Waterford participated with a stand and made a presentation on the Smart-Ply OSB board as an air tight product in passive houses. David McHugh of Pro-Air of Tuam was spreading words of wisdom about ventilation.

New classification of Passive houses by PHI

New classification of Passive houses by PHI

Environmental impact. New from the PHI this year is that they finally seem to be a little interested in the environmental impact and energy lifecycle of the input materials used in construction of passive houses. This is great, objections to the massive usage of environmentally dubious materials in some passive houses, particularly in Germany has been raised in the past. We can only hope that they will but some focus on the complexity of heating, ventilation and other systems of some passive houses in the future. But unfortunately, Dr. Feist et all seems to be moving towards even more complexity, see next item.

New categories. Beside the established Passive House Classic, there will be the Passive House Plus and Passive House Premium classes as well. A new evaluation procedure which also considers energy generation by the building itself will serve as a basis for this. This makes the idea of a Passive house even more difficult to understand. Let us hope that this new complexity does not disencourage ordinary people from the passive house concept.IPHC Leipig 2015 Jürgen Schnieders discussing solar in passive houses with Dr Shane Colclough

Hans Eek of Passivhuscentrum Alingsås, Sweden sharing experiences with Lars Pettersson of Scandinavian Homes at the Intrnational Passive House Conference Leipzig 2015

Hans Eek of Passivhuscentrum Alingsås, Sweden sharing experiences with Lars Pettersson of Scandinavian Homes at the Intrnational Passive House Conference Leipzig 2015

The International Passive House Conference offer a selection of bus-tours to visit various passive building projects in the region. One of the tours demonstrated two passive single family houses and two schools

It is amazing how nice the planning authorities and the local councils arrange for the individual build of privates homes here (keep in mind that this is in former DDR). The houses are built with relatively high density but with individual design and friendly sweeping streets. It feels natural and very family-friendly, human.

Attractive new residential area outside of Halle, Germany

Attractive new residential area outside of Halle, Germany

It is hard not to make the comparison with the British and Irish authoritarian forced uniformity with straight lines, grey concrete and generally very poor usage of the land. What is wrong in Ireland and UK? Are the planners evil or do they just lack taste, compassion and competence? Or is it some deeper cultural quirk that makes this difference?IPHC Leipzig tour 3 to Halle with demonstration of two new single family passive houses

All in all an interesting experience and a great place to learn of the latest in the technological development within the passive house world, and best of all; an opportunity to meet other passive house enthusiasts.

All the best, Passive greetings, Lars Pettersson, Scandinavian Homes, Galway

Report from 19th Passive house conference Leipzig 2015b

TRADITIONAL & HIGH PERFORMANCE

Modern and traditional Irish houses with good long term performance have been built by Scandinavian Homes for many years. This traditional shape is favoured by planning offices all over the west of Ireland. Our solution with barges and maintenance-free STO silicate render works very well.

Nordica 94 in Irish traditional version with barges. Scandinavian Homes standard detail 7.9m wide house. High-performance passive spec, coastal location near Spiddal.

Nordica 94 in Irish traditional version with barges. Scandinavian Homes standard detail.  26 feet wide (7.9m)  High-performance passive spec, coastal location near Spiddal.

 

Traditional barges wide bodied spacious Hibernia passive spec built in Connemara

Traditional barges. Wide bodied spacious Hibernia 126 that is 36 feet wide (11 m) The width gives very high price and energy performance. 3 bedrooms and passive specification, built in Connemara

At design-stage we have to be careful with the window-sizes to avoid overheating when there is no protective overhang of the roof. And the windows must be maintained a little more frequently as they are more exposed to the sun.

Slates, black concrete tiles or modern performance coated sheet metal can be used. Alu-zinc rain-gutters look very well. Windows can be brown stain, white paint or any color in powder-coated aluminium for total maintenance freedom.

House no 285 was built in April 2015. Baltica type that is 7.9m wide. Built in an angle with a large double garage under.  Passive performance. Will have the gables stone-clad as an old  store building. The longsides  will be plastered  with white coloured through silicate render.

House no 285 was built in April 2015. Baltica type that is 7.9m wide. Built in an angle with a large double garage under. Passive performance. Will have the gables stone-clad as an old store building. The longsides will be plastered with white coloured through silicate render.

Traditional Irish cottage Connemara. Classic measurement 6.1m wide. New-built by Scandinavian Homes of Galway. Standard barge detail and mainenance free STO silicate render.

Traditional Irish cottage Connemara. Our classic Atlantica model is  20 feet wide (6.1m). New-built by Scandinavian Homes of Galway in 2005. This Atlantica 61 has attic conversion under 45 degree roof. Standard barge detail and maintenance free STO silicate render.

FRESH AIR-SUPPLY TO STOVE & KITCHEN FAN HEAT-RECOVERY & SIZING OF SOLAR SYSTEM QUESTIONS

Jim, who recently hosted International Passive House Days / Near Zero Energy Buildings – open days in his home, came up with a few pertinent questions. I am sure he is not the only one having thoughts about these issues…. Jim wrote:

Lars, We had a successful weekend for the passive house open days. Over 20 people came to visit. A couple of questions came up that I could do with an answer to:

—Jim: Why would you install a stove that draws air in from the room rather than a sealed unit with a balanced flue to the outside?

Passive two-storey house participating in International passive house open days and Near Zero Energy Buildings open days 2014

Passive two-storey house participating in International passive house open days and Near Zero Energy Buildings open days 2014

—Lars: I see no reason for separate air-supply if that is what you mean. It draws in cold air to the house with constant heat-losses as a consequence. It is difficult and time consuming (costly) to install a cold air supply. And hard to get to fit right onto the stove. The only time needed is at start up of fire when the draft is weak before the heat builds up in the flue/chimney. Our Swedish HRV-units have a function called “fire” that reduces the extract air for a few minutes to let the drag in the chimney build up when the fire is being lit. I have however no personal experience of this trick, for me it has always worked well without that. Another simple solution is to open a window a little for a minute or two while the stove is lightened.

—Jim: Why not install an extractor fan that recycles the air back into the room ?
—Lars: No, this is a very bad idea with all the grease and dirt coming from a kitchen extraction fan. The closest thing is our small HRV unit by Luftmiljö AB. This is only for smaller houses and apartments where the HRV unit is installed above the cooker in the kitchen and is integrated with the cooker-hood. There are still two outlets so that the dirty air is never mixed with the recovery-process.

—Jim: What is the issue having a smaller water tank so that the solar panels heat all the water up more of the time?
—Lars: Yes, a very good idea, a tall narrow 200 liter tank will heat up much faster and stratifies well so that higher temperatures are achieved at the top. The drawback is that the capacity is so small that the system would frequently overheat, boil and go into stagnation. You could only have < 1.8m2 collector area for a 200 liter tank to avoid boiling. I actually have this in our Swedish (now holiday home) house, with 1,8m2 vacuum-tubes, it never boils and gives all the hot water we need in the summer. But with such a small collector we get practically nothing in the late autumn, winter and early spring. To have a small tank and more collectors, you need to have a second larger tank as well, that can act as a buffer-tank.blue sky white sun

Our current thinking after using small systems with 1.8m2 collectors up to large systems with up to 50m2 collector area connected to large seasonal store tanks:

a) Use 200 liter tank as tank 1 in utility room.
b) Use a larger tank as tank 2. This can be between 400 lit and 2000 lit. Should be well insulated and located in a dry insulated utility, basement or nearby garage.
This works as weekly storage/buffer/overheat protection. Dimension the collectors so that boiling and stagnation cannot happen.
c) Overheating and stagnation ages the components including the fluid and shorten the lifespan of the installation.
d) In Ireland we notice that 5.4m2 vacuum-tube collectors is the maximum collector (aperture) area to be used with a 400 liter single tank. In other words, we recommend a minimum of 74 liter tank volume /m2 aperture area to avoid stagnation.

Once a day in winter is all it takes to heat a passive house. With a stove you gain independence.

Once a day in winter is all it takes to heat a passive house. With a stove you gain independence.

—Jim: Everyone was generally impressed with the house and we hope they took the basic principles on board. We had a range of people from a couple living locally who were just curious to couples looking to build, those underway a bricklayer looking to expand his knowledge and an architect.

Hope it went well for you too

Regards, Jim

—Lars, It was good in Galway too, we had more than 30 visitors on the Saturday. Thanks you for your comments, we all need to share some of our experiences of modern passive construction. Thanks again, Lars