PASSIVE HOUSES BUILT AROUND IRELAND 2019 – 2020

We plan to open our office for limited number of visitors in December 2020 Meanwhile, email or ring us to plan your own new passive home. Check www.scanhome.ie for the latest information 

Nordica 125 passive house, single storey with shadingbox and PV solar built in Galway

#321 Nordica 125

  • Passive house
  • Single storey
  • With shadingbox
  • With PV solar panels
  • Built in Galway

 

 

#322 N135-35-IPG passive house with Scandinavian Homes new higher wall, 35°roof-pitch

 

 

#322 Nordica 135

  • Passive house
  • New higher wall:       1 and 3/4 storey
  • 35° roof-pitch
  • Built near Limerick

 

 

 

#323 A135-40-DJB  L-shaped single storey house with local stone cladded gables.

 

#323 Atlantica 136

  • Passive house
  • Single storey
  • 40° roof-pitch
  • Garage / carport
  • Built near Tipperary

 

 

324 H138-35-RSK spacious Hibernia with upstairs and open entrance.

 

 

 

#324 Hibernia 138

  • Passive house
  • 1 and 1/2 storey
  • 35° roof-pitch
  • Open entrance porch
  • Built near Kells
  • Real quarry slates

 

 

#325 Atlantica 61 single storey extension to old house.

#325 Atlantica 61

  • Passive house
  • Single storey
  • 40° roof-pitch
  • Extension to old stone house.

CEDAR PANEL VERSUS PINE PANEL IN MARITIME CLIMATE

Cedar panels with the attractive deep reddish colour have been popular in Ireland for about 15 years now.

Cedar cladded extension to Hibernia in Sweden. If you like this, be aware! It is quite expensive! It takes a lot of skilled maintenance to keep the warm beauty of new freshly oiled cedar panels.

But how well does cedar look after a few years in our maritime climate?

Untreated cedar panels at square dormer of a Nordica 125 in Galway.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We did a small testA piece of cedar panel was left out in the sun and rain for 1 month. The darker sections were treated with our clear and un-pigmented Jupex 45 tung-oil. We also tried our competitor Owatrol’s oil. They all seem to work reasonably well, the wood has a darker attractive red glow.

BUT the disturbing result is the cracking that appeared in the untreated cedar panel test board; After only 1 month cracks appeared where not treated with protective oil. The Irish weather with lots of sunshine AND lots of rain work like a rapid ageing test station.

By comparison, look at the grey timber of the decking behind the sample cedar board. This is 14 year old pine decking at our office. Oiled with pigmented Jupex 45 three  times in 14 years. Still pretty good.

17 year old Scandinavian homes timber pine external panel treated with Jupex 45 tung oil in Galway

The other attractive look of cedar, the aged silver grey look, is hard to get in our damp climate. In dry climates it is easy, just leave the cedar alone and it will become silver grey, just like an old barn in Siberia. But we are not in Siberia or dry Wyoming. We are in rainy Ireland and here it will go black from lichens and algae!

The problem is that by applying too much protective oil it goes even more black!

Some suppliers sell ageing agents to make the fresh cedar go grey faster. But how does that treatment prevent cracking?

This is as grey as pine becomes near the polar circle in the middle of Sweden after 150 years. Grey but also black. Light silver grey will only develop in really really dry and cold places like Siberia.

 

 

Our conclusion is that it must be better to use our standard treated scots-pine boards instead of the 4 times more expensive cedar panels in Ireland. 

 

#310 HIBERNIA 113 WITH UPSTAIRS IN WICKLOW

Our most energy and price efficient shape is the almost square Hibernia 113 with upstairs conversion. Almost magic – it looks so small and still contains 5 spacious bedrooms, larder, utility and all the rest in an open generous layout.

H113 compact five bedroom home in Wicklow on first day of building

Inside a Scandinavian Homes passive house at 3rd day of construction. Insulated foundation and shell plus some materials.

Radon barrier sealed to 110mm sewerpipe by Scandinavian Homes foundation experts in our super-insulated concrete foundation.

Trailer at Scandinavian Homes factory with the complete H113 house including most materials.

#310 H113/35 passive home in Wicklow

NEW HOUSE IN ATHBOY – NORDICA 125 WITH UPSTAIRS AND SQUARE DORMER

Articulated trailer filled up with batts of Rockwool

Massive amounts of Rockwool insulation for passive upgrade of walls for house in Athboy

insulation at Scandinavian Homes house factory.

Concrete raft foundation with 280mm of polystyrene insulation under the concrete.

280 mm of polystyrene insulation in passive foundation.

 

 

 

House # 308: passive Nordica 125 with extra high walls, 35 degree roof and a square dormer built near Athboy

Nordica 125 passive foundation, walls, roof, windows and doors.

 

 

 

VISIT US AND MEET OUR PASSIVE HOUSE ARCHITECT PETER LOHR – SATURDAY FEBRUARY 18TH

We are delighted to give the opportunity to all interested to meet in person with our passive house architect Peter Lohr.SCH announce showhouse Feb 2017The best time to experience a warm passive house without heating system is in the winter.

Let’s hope for cold and windy weather!

This house was built in 2005, so you get to see what it looks like after 11 years.

Livingroom used as lecture room in passive house

We will give passive house presentations with question and answer sessions.

Whole house ventilation system with heat recovery explained.

Lars Pettersson, Passive house enthusiast

Lars Pettersson, Passive house enthusiast

Lots of different plans and price proposals are available.All interested are welcome.No appointment needed, just show up!

Find directions to our passive house in Moycullen, Galway here:

www.scanhome.ie 

Interesting projects: Crazy design for fabulous Hibernia 109 overlooking Fjord in Sweden

Crazy design for passive house in Lysekil high on rocks, overlooking the Gullmars-Fjord. A normal Hibernia 109 is Super-tweaked by Designstudio Geir Henning.

Update with pictures of completed home. The alu-zink coated roof looks very shiny when new. It will develop and look more dull with age.

H109 Cedar cladded extension and square dormer

Hibernia 109 with Cedar cladding on extension + a square dormer

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hibernia 109 Scandinavian Homes passive house with cedar extension and alu-zinc coated steel roof by Plannja. Built in Lysekil, Sweden.

Hibernia 109 Scandinavian Homes passive house with cedar extension and alu-zinc coated steel roof by Plannja. Built in Lysekil, Sweden. 

 

Cadar cladded extension to Hibernia house at a cliff in Lysekil. If you like this, be aware! It is quite expensive! And it take a lot of skilled maintenance too keep the warm beauty of new freshly oiled cedar panels.

Cedar cladding extension to Hibernia house at a cliff in Lysekil. If you like this, be aware! It is quite expensive! And it takes a lot of skilled maintenance too keep the warm beauty of new freshly oiled cedar panels.

Some interior footage of home:

A word of warning when installing large panoramic windows. External shading must be provided to prevent over-heating. This is difficult to do in a wind-exposed coastal location as this.

Livingroom with a view: Large windows with electric automatic built-in shuttering to prevent overheating.

Living room with a view: Large windows with electric automatic built-in shuttering to prevent overheating.

Our solution is NorDan-Screens. This is a new NorDan innovation with automatic remote controlled shutters integrated with the windows. We install windows with shuttering in the wall sections in our house-factory. The system can run automatically or via the remote control.
Read more here: http://www.nordan.se/proff/nordan-screens

Modern open plan kitchen with crazy ceiling mounted monster extract fan over cooker. This can suck up small children so be careful!

Modern open plan kitchen with crazy ceiling mounted monster extract fan over cooker. This can suck up small children so be careful!

 

Open plan kitchen and living area creates luxurious feeling of space and this takes advantage of the extraordinary ocean view.

 

 

 

Wall hung WC makes cleaning easier but maintenance of WC more difficult. We prefer the Ifö model that is wall hung but still shows the cistern

Wall hung WC makes cleaning easier but maintenance of WC more difficult. We prefer the Ifö model that is wall hung but still shows the cistern

IMG_4756

 

This is Scandinavian Homes house number 295 since we started business.

House #295 Hibernia 109 with felted roof overlooking fjord

Our solution is NorDa

Spectacular setting in the rocks after a lot of rock-blasting and construction of retaining walls. Scandinavian Homes crew had good luck with the weather this time, the erection worked out just as planned and on time.

Highly insulated raft foundation ready for concrete in April 2016.

Highly insulated raft foundation ready for concrete in April 2016.

 

Fun design

Hibernia 113 with high roofpitch and spectaccular view of Gullmars-Fjorden

Hibernia 109 with high roof-pitch and spectacular view of Gullmars-Fjorden.

Passive house

Velded roofing material at floor and wall ´+ dormer roof

Waiting for velding of roofing material, this is done later the same day.                                               Roof and dormer covered with our high performance (modern and traditional) roofing-felt Supertak YEP700.

 

 

Roofintegrated balcony

Balcony integrated in roof

Balcony integrated in roof

 

INTERESTING PROJECTS SKAGERACK 188 IN GALWAY — UPDATE WITH PICTURES –NO TILES IN THE KITCHEN!

S188GWA wall on production table

S188GWA wall on production table

We publish a few more pictures of the construction of this two-storey house that is now nearing completion. This is a Nordica 94 in two-storey version called Skagerack 188. Superpassive specification (335mm of pure insulation in wall, 700mm in roof), large array of PV solar on the roof and some sections of the facade cladded with natural stone.

Scroll to bottom to see all pictures!

Our jig for precision manufacturing of floor cassettes in house-factory.

Our jig for precision manufacturing of floor cassettes in our factory.

 

 

 

 

 

Our customer Gareth Walsh asked a question about tiles in the kitchen of his newly built Skagerack 188 that could be of general interest, so we share the conversation here:

S188 packet of factory made closed panel walls protected in cage, ready to be shipped

S188 packet of factory made closed panel walls protected in cage, ready to be shipped

House after the first week in December 2015

House after the first week in December 2015

Hi Lars, When agreeing the contract I asked for all floors except all bathrooms and utility to the engineered pine and that is what you included. I am being strongly encouraged to tile the kitchen area around the island. This comes to about 9 sqm. Would this be a problem for you to reduce the flooring area in pine by this much? I assume that the wood flooring you included also includes finishing with oil? Gareth

Dear Gareth,
I don’t agree with tiles in the kitchen at all, I will try to explain our thinking:.

a) In places where you stand a lot, for example around the hob and sink, it is very bad to have hard tiles. In fact, it would be illegal for health reasons if it was a workplace. A bouncy mat is usually located where you stand, eg. in front of machines. This is even more important in a warm and clean house where you stand without shoes.

Kitchen from 1995 with Morkaskog oiled engineered pine floor in a Scandinavian Home. Cleaned with white-soap all this years and survived OK after bringing up 3 children.

Kitchen from 1995 with Morkaskog oiled engineered pine floor in a Scandinavian Home. Cleaned with white-soap all this years and survived OK after bringing up 3 children.

b) Cleanliness-wise, it is a lot easier to clean the wooden floor than the a tiled floor, it is smooth and has no dirt-collecting grout recesses.

c) The most important reason to not have tiles in the kitchen is because of their conductive nature. This ceramic material is naturally cold to the touch compared to wood. This is because the heat energy is absorbed or “sucked” into the tile like with most conducive materials eg. metals. This would be OK if floor-heat is left on, however, if floor- heat is used under large tiled areas the house tends to overheat even in the winter. Contrary to common belief, it is better to have a wooden floor on top of the concrete, it evens out the heat given off, and adds to the thermal stability of the house. Keep in mind that there is almost a foot of insulation under the concrete. This is why we recommend to focus the floor-heat in the relatively small tiled wet-rooms and possibly inside the front door.

Classic bathroom in a new Scandinavian Homes house, all tiled, comortable with the standard floor heat

Classic bathroom in a new Scandinavian Homes house, all tiled, comfortable with the standard floor heat

d) If you drop something on a tiled floor it breaks, if you drop something on a wooden floating floor it usually survives.

e) Wooden panels can be used for the walls in bathrooms in warm and ventilated houses. Not behind the shower of course, but for the rest of the room and even behind the bath tub it is OK. We are however always careful to waterproof the floor and walls in all wet-rooms. Our special seal-system is applied before the tiling and wood-panelling.

Bathroom slated floor in a Scanhome from 2003

Slated bathroom floor in a Scanhome from 2003.  Linseed-oil painted wooden panels. Observe the tiles turned up around the walls.

 
f) Yes, the Mörkaskog engineered pine-floor is lyed and oiled from factory.

atb Lars

More pictures from the build:

On day of erection the roof construction with regular rooftrusses  shown.

On day of erection the roof construction with regular roof-trusses shown.

Tusses with support for gangway in cold attic. Under this gangway the 700mm depth of cellulose insulation can easily be checked in the future.

Trusses with support for gangway in cold attic. Under this gangway the 700mm depth of cellulose insulation can easily be checked in the future.

Gangway and some ventilation ducts installed, all insulation is not blown in place at this time

Gangway and some ventilation ducts installed, all insulation is not blown in place at this time

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

More pictures;

Addition of final 70mm service-cavity filled with 70mm of Rockwool. At this stage the fantastic air-tightness figure of 0.19 exchanges per hour at 50 Pa was already achieved.

Addition of final 70mm service-cavity filled with 70mm of Rockwool. At this stage the fantastic air-tightness figure of 0.19 exchanges per hour at 50 Pa was already achieved. Super-carpenters John Goaley and Cathal Lydon in action..

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nearing completion in Early April, 3.5 months from start.

Nearing completion in early April, 3.5 months from start.

 

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NEW RECORD ? – 0.19 AIR-EXCHANGES/HOUR @ 50 Pa

Peter Flaherty and Thomas Monaghan of Advanced Airtighness Solutions after a successful airtightnesstest.

Peter Flaherty and Thomas Monaghan of Advanced Airtighness Solutions after a successful airtightness test on February 10th 2016.

Passive House verification sheet.

Passive House verification sheet.

A record air-tightness of  0.19 air-exchanges per hour at 50 Pa pressure was measured at the preliminary pressure test today. The house is a Skagerack 188 built in Galway city.

Walls flipped over at production table in factory

Walls of two-storey house flipped over at production table in factory

This house was produced in our factory in late November and erection on site started on December 1st.

Scandinavian Homes standardized production methods ensure a uniform quality. This is extra valuable when building two-storey houses where it can be tricky to get the construction air tight between the floors.

House in factory last week of November 2015

House in factory last week of November 2015

The German Passive House Institute require an air-tightness <0.6 exchanges/h, so 0.19 exchanges/h is considered very good. That said, we still focus more on the outer air-tightness. For real world heat-losses in windy climates, we consider this outer air-tightness more important than the inner air-tightness that can be measured with this blower door test.

Another funny fact is that since PHI in Darmstadt does not recognize Swedish test results of the REC Temovex Blue 4 HRV unit (92% efficiency in Sweden),we are handicapped by being forced to use poorer default value of 80%

House after the first week in December 2015

House after the first week in December 2015